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Take the Chill Out of Winter Bills   Between holiday houseguests and shorter, colder days, electric bills tend to climb in the winter....
Students can apply for all-expenses-paid trip to DC Lyndon B. Johnson, a Texas native and the 36th United States president, was a great national...
Some of our linemen put in some hard work getting our bucket truck ready for the Coleman Christmas Parade. After rolling through downtown Coleman...

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DID YOU KNOW?

If you create an online account with CCEC, you can do the following:

View/Pay your Bill

Usage History

Payment History

Temperature averages per month

& Much More!!!

Set up your account today!

 

Be prepared for Winter Storms

When winter temperatures drop and storms hit, it can be challenging to stay safe and warm. Winter storm severity varies depending on where you live, but nearly all Americans are affected by extreme winter storms at some point. CCEC cares about your safety, and we want you to be prepared.

Heavy snow and ice can lead to downed power lines, leaving co-op members without power. During extremely low temperatures, this can be dangerous. During a power outage, our crews will continue to work as quickly and safely as possible to restore power, but there are a few things you can do to prepare yourself.

·       Stay warm – Plan to use a safe alternate heating source, such as a fireplace or wood-burning stove during a power outage. These are great options to keep you and your loved ones warm, but exercise caution when using, and never leave the heating source unattended. If you are using gasoline-, propane- or natural gas-burning devices to stay warm, never use them indoors. Remember that fuel- and wood-burning sources of heat should always be properly ventilated. Always read the manufacturer’s directions before using.

·       Stay fed – The CDC recommends having several days’ supply of food that does not need to be cooked handy. Crackers, cereal, canned goods and bread are good options. Five gallons of water per person should also be available in the event of an extended power outage.

·        Stay safe – When an outage occurs, it usually means power lines are down. It is best not to travel during winter storms, but if you must, bring a survival kit along, and do not travel alone. If you encounter downed lines, always assume they are live. Stay as far away from the downed lines as possible, and report the situation to our dispatchers by calling [phone number] if possible.

Winter weather can be unpredictable and dangerous, and planning ahead can often be the difference between life and death. [Insert co-op/PPD/PUD name] is ready for what Mother Nature has in store, and we want you to be ready, too. For more winter safety tips, visit our safety page, OR visit www.read.gove/winter-weather.

 

Understanding Energy Demand & Purchasing

You may not think you need to have an understanding of energy demand and purchasing, but do you ever look at your energy bill and wonder what it all means? If your answer to that question is “yes,” then you might be interested to learn how demand impacts your utility bill.  

To start, it is important to understand how electricity is made and how it is delivered to your home.

Before Coleman County Electric can send electricity to your home, that electricity needs to be generated by a Generation and Transmission cooperative (G&T). Once the electricity has been generated, it travels over high-voltage transmission lines to substations, where the voltage is reduced to a safer level. The electricity then travels over distribution power lines and finds its way into your home. So, while you pay your bill to us – your electric distribution cooperative – we don’t actually generate the electricity you use. That is the job of the G&T.  

We do help to determine how much electricity our members need to power their homes and businesses, and you play a big part in determining how much electricity the G&T needs to create in order to keep the lights on in our community. That is where these terms “consumption” and “demand” come in.

Consumption is measured in kilowatt hours (kWh). Demand is measured in kilowatts (kW). A light bulb “consumes” a certain number of watts, let’s say 100 watts per hour. If that light bulb stays on for 10 hours, it “demands” a certain number of kilowatts (in this case, 1 kW) from the generation station producing electricity. Now, if you turn on 10, 100-watt light bulbs in your home for one hour, you are still consuming the same number of kW. However, you are placing a demand on the utility to have those kW available to you over the course of one hour, instead of ten. This requires the generation and transmission plant to produce more power in less time in order to meet your demand.

CCEC purchases kilowatt hours from the G&T based on the average demand of our members. Peak demand refers to the time of day when the demand for electricity is highest. This is typically during the evening when families return home from work or school, cook dinner and use appliances the most. Using electricity during this peak demand period often costs more to both Coleman County Electric and to our members.

Demand is the reason your electricity bill fluctuates season to season and even year to year. Generating and distributing power can be a tricky and complicated business, but rest assured CCEC will always meet the necessary demand to provide safe, reliable and affordable electricity to your family.